Holiday Bandits Hit Alphabet Streets

Gone ghost
Photo courtesy of Tim Huber

By GABRIELLA BOCK | Reporter 

“The Grinch started early this year,” Palisadian Timothy Huber said after a crew of thieving humbugs swept the Alphabet Streets of multiple Halloween home decorations last month.

On Oct. 28, just a few days before Halloween, Huber and his children went outside to find that their 12-foot-tall inflatable ghost had disappeared from the front lawn of their Iliff Street home.

Just around the corner on Monument Avenue, John Beaver and his family are grieving the loss of a set of five-foot light up pumpkins stolen sometime during the middle of the day.

And this wasn’t the first time Beaver’s house has been stripped of its holiday cheer: Last year the family’s set of prized wire reindeer went missing at Christmas time.

Beaver told the Palisadian-Post that his inexpensive set of pumpkins were monetarily worthless to anyone trying to turn a profit, a factor that has led him to believe that the thieves are more likely to be pranksters attempting to sour the community’s holiday revelries.

“Scrooge’s nephews strike yet again,” he reported. “Neighbors enjoy seeing the colorful decorations every year so it’s a real shame when unkind people have to come and ruin it.”

Others in the area have dealt with similar beloved decorations gone amiss: Two residents on Hartzell Avenue had lights and blow-up props removed from their yards while another two homeowners in El Medio Bluffs were saddened to find that their holiday zombies had somehow wandered off their properties.

In Pacific Palisades, home decorating is an adored annual tradition beginning with the Fourth of July and rounding off with the Post’s Deck Your Halls holiday decorating contest in December.

And although the theft of their decorations came as an unpleasant surprise, both Beaver and Huber told the Post that they aren’t going to let a few rotten eggs ruin their families’ festive spirits.

“Despite all of the stolen items, we are still planning to do up our house big for the holidays,” Beaver said.

And for the porch pirates and pumpkin bandits?

“We hope they get coal in their stockings.”